Things you didn’t know you can recycle

It’s not just about paper, tins and bottles, you know.

There are loads of different things you use around the house that can be taken away and recycled if you knew what they are and where you have to take them.

Here are a few of the everyday objects that you didn’t know had a second life.

Water filters

It’s likely that you’ve got a water filter in your kitchen that gives you cool, clear water to drink. They last about a month before the filter becomes less effective and needs to be changed. They’re made out of plastic with the filter part typically being made from carbon granules. Both can be easily recycled, and you can take them back to the shop or supermarket from where they were bought, where there should be a bin.

Mobile phone

Most people change their mobile every two or three years, usually at the end of their contract. Who wants to be seen with an old model, right? However, unless you’re the kind of butter-fingers who keeps dropping their mobile, most are still perfectly usable and can be recycled. The good news for most of us is that your old phone could be worth money, and phone recycling companies will buy and old phone from you. They’ll refurbish it and reuse it in developing countries. But even if you’ve got a really old model that’s not worth anything, you can still give it to charity, or drop it in an electric good recycling bin, where it can be broken up to recycle the metals inside.

Hair dryer

Old hair dryer packed up? Got a new one for birthday or Christmas? Don’t throw it out – it still has an unlikely recycling value. In fact, some companies do a swap deal, where they’ll give you money off your new one if you hand in your old. They’re able to recycle the plastic shell, as well as the mostly-metal insides. Failing that, it’s perfectly good to go in a recycling bin for electricals.

Old shoes 

Your old trainers may look completely worn out, but they’re still useful to somebody. Charities like the Salvation Army have shoe collection bins, and they’ll give better quality shoes to people who need them, or to sell in their shops. But if they’re not worth saving, your old shoes are still full of useful materials like rubber that can be recycled into new shoes, other rubber goods, and even road surfaces!

Look around at home. What’s the recycling story for things you use every day?